A VIDEO

kardashy:

its impossible to watch this and be sad

Reblogged from
A VIDEO

emilyisobsessed:

Leslie Knope tries impressions and accents

image

A PHOTO
Reblogged from frivolo
A TEXT POST

iammatildawormwood:

as if I wasn’t already a loser to begin with, the good lord said ‘here’s some musical theatre, knock yourself out.’

A VIDEO

rubybruise:

glitteraxe:

monicalewinsky1996:

Trigger warning: Breakfast

oh my goodness

‘Random things’ also can be triggering for me Male comedians, people’s grandparents, not being able to stand up for myself when i am cat called or groped, lots of these things
A PHOTO
Reblogged from matter
A PHOTO

catmota:

A Steady Drizzle

Norman Garstin  (1847 – 1926)

Reblogged from Twenty-One. Manhattan.
A PHOTO

anna-toman:

this is the last one!

Reblogged from the tide is rising.
A TEXT POST

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 
Reblogged from frivolo
A VIDEO

asylum-art:

Margaret Bowland:  Beauty in the unconscious

Facebook |  at Driscoll Babcock Gallery

Margaret Bowland was born in Burlington, North Carolina, and studied studio art and English at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Her work explores the concept of beauty—what it means to be beautiful, but also to what extent it is significant today, both in the world and in art. ‘Being beautiful is a form of wealth, says Bowland.

She considers that the commonly held ideal of beauty is to be tall, thin and white. And while we recognize deviations from this norm can have appeal, are deviations nonetheless. ‘The need to be beautiful fuels one of the largest and most ruthless industries in our world,’ she says.

Bowland currently lives in Brooklyn and teaches painting at New York Academy. Her work has been exhibited at Greenville County Museum of Art in South Carolina and Babcock Galleries in New York, among others.

Reblogged from Asylum Art